Concept



Alternative beauty, theatrical, and effects makeup.



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The designer told me to play. I sent an entire crew of models down the runway in variations on this neo-kabuki theme contrasting hard edges with soft blending. Each of them were unique, but the theme was cohesive.

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An example of historical makeup designed to look completely bare-faced. Revolutionary War soldier "private Robert Shurtliff" AKA Deborah Sampson. From the impeccably-researched Women Warriors" series by E. Katie Holm.

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I wanted the eye to move through this image' I painted the face-framing collar, using colors in the model's tattoos and similar color gradient. I then buffed in some powders to create luminosity and add a fluid feel. Softness in harder edges, like the model herself. I crafted the butterfly belt on-set.

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The designer and I met the day of the shoot. She and I sat down and I used a drawing program to quickly sketch up looks. I eased up the edginess until she said, "yes, that one." I airbrushed the model's lips for this tone and texture.

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We wanted a dolly-like look,with an unsettling twist. The photographer requested circular cheeks. I chose to give a grittier texture to the skin and roughly smoke the outer edge of the eyes to complement the spiky lashes, I then added just a tiny hint of life to the lips with a blushed inner rim and hand-painted cracks. I made the red and black pony-falls that we twisted into buns. We shot in glaring-white snow.

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The model actually had a pixie-cut. The headpiece was sculpted and painted by me and the hair is a wig, some jumbo braids, and two pony-falls, blended and braided by me.

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An example of historical makeup designed to look completely bare-faced. Jamaican national heroine "Nanny of the Maroons". From the impeccably-researched Women Warriors" series by E. Katie Holm

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We wanted the model lovely, but frosty. I added wind-kissed cheeks, nose, ear-tips, and chin. I made the mascara in a fit of inspiration to frost the lashes at the last minute. This was in a Minnesota winter, so I was on standby to wrap the trooper of a model in blankets between shots. We were all knee-deep in snow.

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I arrived to this shoot and partnered with a haunted-house artist. He laid down the white body makeup. I went in and added depth and highlight, and added texture to the hair to make her look a little colder and grittier. I Painted the second model in contrast. Warmer, but steadily getting more sickly and dirty as the story went on. I also dirtied up and roughed-up the clothing and blanket. It's amazing what you can do with an old motherboard, Folger's crystals, and charcoal powder.

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An example of historical makeup designed to look completely bare-faced. I used traditional bear grease, provided by the model, to style her hair. Cherokee "Beloved Woman" Nanyehi. From the impeccably-researched Women Warriors" series by E. Katie Holm

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The designer wanted slightly sickly "tuberculosis chic". Subtle but a bit creepy.

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From a Frankenstein musical. I was called in suddenly by the costumer. There was not time to order specialty supplies, so it was all out-of-kit. This was my first attempt at scar-work, and it had to hold up under dance and sweat. It was trial by fire with a full torso and head to be done in an hour. I made sure to mix work that was smooth and puckered, deep gouges and raised sculpted pieces. I then went in with a fine brush to paint the coloration and make it more believable.

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